Purposes of Writing Pantomime

Author: Cassie Walker
Year: 2006
Artform: Theatre
Subjects: Language Arts
Grade: 5th Grade
Duration: 45 minutes
Overview:

Pantomime is a style of theater without sounds or props. Challenge your students to portray an author’s purpose (narrative, informative/expository, opinion/persuasive) in this unique acting style.

SUPPLIES, EQUIPMENT AND RESOURCES

Index cards identifying the 3 different text types/purposes

Download PDF Lesson Plan

Standards & Objectives

Fine Art Standards
Integrated Standards
Objectives

FIFTH GRADE UEN 2010 THEATER STANDARD 2, OBJECTIVE 1:

Develop body awareness and spatial perception through movement and pantomime.

FIFTH GRADE ELA WRITING: TEXT TYPES AND PURPOSES:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1

Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.3

Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

In groups, students will plan and perform pantomimes to represent the different types/purposes of writing.

Teaching and Timeline

Introduction

Game: “What Are You Doing?”

(5 minutes) The first student begins a pantomime of an everyday activity. The next student asks, “What are you doing?” Each student says something different from what they are doing, and each student pantomimes the previous student’s answer.

For example:

  • Callie starts at the front of the room, pantomiming brushing her teeth.
  • Nadia comes up to Callie and asks, “What are you doing?”
  • Callie responds, “Playing with my dog.”
  • Callie sits back down, and Nadia pantomimes playing with a dog.
  • Jamal comes up to Nadia and asks, “What are you doing?”
  • Nadia must respond with a different answer, etc.

Purpose: Get familiar with pantomime, think creatively, warm up to performing.

Demonstration

Teacher Model:

(2 minutes) Explain and model pantomime: acting with no sounds and no props. See if the students can guess where you are and what you are doing: eating popcorn at a movie theater, grocery shopping, driving a car, etc.

 

Guided Practice:

(3 minutes) In a circle, lead all students to pantomime washing their hands, drinking a glass of water, brushing their teeth, and other day-to-day activities.

 

Language Arts Instruction:

(5 minutes) Teach or review the three types of writing. Write the types and helpful hints on the whiteboard.

Work Period

In groups of 3 or 4, students have 15 minutes to plan and practice a pantomime that portrays one of the three types of writing. Students may choose to act out what the writing says, or they may choose to act out the environment and actions of the person reading. Students may use chairs, but no other props.

Circle the room, offering help where necessary.

Closure/Summary

Performance:

(15 minutes) Students will perform their pantomimes, and the audience will guess what type of writing they portray.

INTEGRATION INFORMATION

Helpful hint for your students: the reaction of the READER tells more about the writing than the actions of the WRITER.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
  • What are the three purposes of writing, and how are they different?
  • How can I act out one type of writing in a clear way, without using words or objects?
DIFFERENTIATION

Adapt as necessary for students with individual abilities and needs.

ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES

Performance Checklist:

  • Did students clearly portray the type of writing they selected?
  • Were students’ actions and intentions clear, even without props or voices?
VOCABULARY
  • Pantomime
  • Narrative
  • Explanatory
  • Informational
  • Opinion
  • Persuasive

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